Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

Women’s ordination and inclusion as leaders within the early church can be seen clearly when we explore how women participated in Jesus’ ministry, with specific attention to Acts 9:1–2.

KEEP READING

The Bible is full of vivid maternal descriptions of God, yet many of us are still uncomfortable using maternal language to talk about God or to God. Reclaiming God’s feminine attributes helps us grow closer to God.

KEEP READING

We in the church have the responsibility to lead the charge in revolutionizing our misuse of gendered language. We have the clearest picture of how gender relations should be. We have the power to change the narrative.

KEEP READING

Hidden preconceptions cloud the behavior and language of our lives. One place this is clear is in how male pronouns and language dominate the language of educational settings, society, and the church.

KEEP READING

A deeper understanding of how the Finnish and German languages approach pronouns helps us see that it is possible to move past the nuances of language to the universal message of the Gospel.

KEEP READING

We stand united in Christ to proclaim women’s dignity and purpose through accurate Bible translations, remembering that dehumanizing ideas about people lead to dehumanizing actions.

KEEP READING

In the second of several conversations sponsored by CBE and our 2021 Conference partners in the UK, Charles Read asked three conference speakers to consider how churches can better value women leaders. 

KEEP READING

Stereotypes say women are too emotional to lead, while men are clear and logical leaders. But when we look at the Bible, we find that these stereotypes are not only incorrect, they are also unbiblical.  

KEEP READING

Monica, the church mother and venerated saint, was the reason her son, Augustine of Hippo, became a Christian. Her influence over Christianity cannot be understated, and her story must be remembered.

KEEP READING

Find out how Florence Tim Oi Li's story ends. Li was a Chinese woman from Hong Kong, who was ordained as a the first female Anglican priest in 1944, nearly 30 years before it was permitted in her province and 50 years before the ordination of the first woman priests in the Church of England

KEEP READING