Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

With many versions of the Bible for children, Judah and Chelsea Smith add a creative new twist to Bible stories. Each story in I Will Follow Jesus: Storybook Bible is retold in an accurate and child- friendly way. Stories are accompanied by a short lesson that relates the Bible to a child's life and experiences

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In the end, I find that Marry Him and Be Submissive stands as a good account of the author’s life and opinions but in no way reflects biblical instruction on marriage and/or submission.

As a fun read about someone’s life = A-

As a book about Christian marriage = D

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The Gender Conversation is a book that emerged as a result of a symposium hosted by Marling College in 2015. The purpose of the symposium was to "deepen mutual understanding and respect, highlight common ground, clarify points of difference, and unite us all in a quest to learn from the Scriptures and live in the light of the gospel."

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Alan Garrett's book UNSilenced thoroughly explores all of the major questions, issues, and arguments presented by evangelicals who have a distorted view of gender and the Bible. 

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This latest volume in the International Leadership Association Series considers the leadership of women in multiple positions from multiple theoretical perspectives. The foreword states that the book intends to change “how we think about theorizing women’s leadership.” It proposes that a working theory will create social transformation in developing women leaders and will “restructure organizations to be more equitable and sustainable.” 

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Does God Make the Man? is a fascinating look at how evangelical and ecumenical men process the messages they hear about masculinity from religion and media. The authors organized focus groups and recorded hundreds of hours of conversations to see if religion is vital to developing masculine identity. They conclude that, although evangelical men may claim to learn gender roles from the Bible, the actual sources of this knowledge are media and culture. 

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In summation, Westfall’s book does not offer the church merely an egalitarian reading of a few isolated texts. Instead, she paints a broad and coherent mosaic that will force complementarians to grapple not only with her judicious exegesis of the relevant texts, but also with the reality that the totality of Paul’s theology supports women in ministry. Paul, as Westfall has amply established, is more than the sum of a few verses; indeed, Paul is the apostle not just to men, but also to women.

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In short, Bain’s study demonstrates first that studying women in the Hellenistic cultures of the first two centuries AD is more complex than has typically been recognized. Gender is not an isolated indicator of status. Rather, gender, marital status, and socioeconomic status are interwoven. An understanding of women’s religious leadership therefore rests on integrated knowledge of these and other factors.

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In the new Common English Women’s Bible . . . Seminary professors, pastors, congregational leaders, and several novelists all contribute, successfully, to the goal of helping Bible women be more accessible in Scripture . . and indeed those Bible women light up the text. In dozens of character sketches, sidebars, and reflections . . . the writers help set each woman in her nuanced context, bringing theological, historical, and ethical considerations into play.

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Gary Hoag revisits the topic of wealth in the letter of 1 Timothy, asking whether the teachings found there are consistent or inconsistent with other teachings in the NT, or whether it might be a mixture of the two. Scholars are divided on this question. Hoag’s findings rest on cross-referencing the terms in 1 Timothy with a novel, Ephesiaca by Xenophon of Ephesus. This novel was originally thought to have been written in the 2nd or 3rd century CE, but having been recently codified as an ancient Greek novel of the mid-first century CE, we now know that it was written at the same time as Paul’s ministry as portrayed by Luke in Acts. It’s a valuable source in shedding light on the social setting or Sitz im Leben of the letter, and Hoag studies in particular five passages: 1 Tim 2:9-15; 3:1-13; 6:1-2a; 6:2b-10; 6:17-19.

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