Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

This book is about widows, but some of the widows chosen are better known as mothers or because of their remarriages. It is written for widows, and for women in crisis. It quietly and simply speaks words of comfort, encouragement, and practical advice.

This book is useful for more than widows. Many of the issues focused on such as generosity, prayer, and faith are issues that have been important to me as a life-long single woman.

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Overall, Shalom Sistas is a fun read. It’s not too heavy on theology, but not without it. It’s primarily story-based, but also teaches the reader the peacemaking way of life. It’s humorous, but the reader will sometimes find herself crying. At the end of the day, it’s worth taking the time to join Osheta Moore, and think about bringing shalom to all areas of our lives.

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In 1994, 10 percent of Rwanda’s population was slaughtered in a mass genocide over a period of 100 days. In the aftermath, Rwandans struggled to secure food and water, find loved ones, and rebuild a sense of security. Into this chaos stepped the women of Rwanda, who defied tradition to take on leadership roles and recovery efforts while dealing with individual and collective trauma and grief. Rwandan Women Rising, by Swanee Hunt, documents the remarkable stories, motivations, and lessons that these women experienced while working to rebuild their country and redefine what it means to be Rwandan. 

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The Beguines were a Christian ministry originating among the women of the laity outside of those who took monastic vows and entered convents. The “Beguines” gained their identity from a Belgic root-word—beg—meaning to mumble or to speak without clarity. This term was used disparagingly by highly privileged men who were jealous of women who were able to live independently economically and hold positions of privilege. The Beguines represented a broad spectrum of women of differing backgrounds who gave their lives and means to help the destitute, the ill, the downtrodden, and the homeless. Laura Swan’s history of the Beguines is the first good complete treatment of the Beguines that this reviewer has ever seen.

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At a time when our society is deeply divided along many cultural lines, it is refreshing to find a book that is written with altruism. While Mary Detweiler clearly advocates for gender equality within the Christian church, she does so with charity and thoughtfulness. The writing is clear and concise and grace filled—as becomes a disciple of Christ. Additionally, Detweiler has written a book that introduces the primary issues facing egalitarians in an easy to understand way.

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This 120-page book is one of the most powerful books on empowering women for ministry I have ever read. I might even say it is the best I have ever read. Nicole Massie Martin, an ordained minister, speaks from the trenches. The content is honest, down to earth, truthful, convicting, and painful. Her observations are so accurate and timely, that throughout the book I found myself thinking, “She sure knows what she is talking about.” 

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Every time discouragement sets in because of the slow progress of egalitarian ideas, we ought to be able to reach over our shoulders and pull from the shelf a book such as Sapinsley's. The story of Mrs. Packard (1816-1897), set in the American midwest, should remind all of us how much has been accomplished by our forebears.

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This book is intended to be read as a study, and is well structured for that purpose. It is printed in a large easy-to-read font to accommodate many types of readers. Chapters are brief, but thought provoking, and include explanation of historical context. Fuerst includes reflection questions, prayers, and practical applications for living out the lesson of God’s radical inclusion in our time. I highly recommend this study in your Advent journey! 

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Mimi Haddad's forword to Paul Chilcote's The Methodist Defense of Women in Ministry.

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The four-volume Dictionary of Daily Life in Biblical and Post-Biblical Antiquity (DDL) provides a well-rounded overview of life not only across time periods but also across the several cultures of the biblical world. Thirty-three scholars, including editors Edwin M. Yamauchi (Professor Emeritus of History at Miami University) and Marvin R. Wilson (Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies at Gordon College), have contributed to the DDL. Readers of Priscilla Papers will tend to regret that only three of these contributors are women (Rozenn Bailleul-LeSuer, Robin Gallaher Branch, and Laura A. Dunn). The selection of articles and the information included in them is broad and balanced; nevertheless, a broader diversity of authorship could make the study richer. All contributors are reputable scholars and have provided high quality and up-to-date information.

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