Welcome to CBE’s Library

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In my opinion, this book is an important contribution, for Methodists and other Wesleyans to be sure, but for other Christians as well.

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Like the parables of Jesus, these stories will open your eyes to see and your ears to hear the truths that are needed in our work for gender equality for all girls.

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A Zoom conversation with Kelley Nikondeha, author of CBE’s book club pick Defiant: What the Women of Exodus Teach Us about Freedom.

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Kelley Nikondeha serves up powerful insights from the stories of the women of Exodus, the stories of women who resisted historical and modern injustices, and her own experiences.

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Emily Onyango discusses the work of the African Church For Biblical Equality towards achieving mutuality of men and women in the church and society as a mark of Christian identity.

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Women throughout history have been at the forefront of the holy resistance to violence and hatred and death.

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Pure examines the harmful effects of evangelical Christianity's purity culture with particular emphasis on the long-lasting and outward-rippling effects of shame. Of particular interest to CBE's audience, the book details the ways in which purity culture cooperates with patriarchy and harms women. 

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The ”Real Men” workshop discusses the lies men believe, their challenges, and their role in promoting egalitarianism. 

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As a whole, Feminist Thought is a thoroughly-researched and concise treatment of a notoriously controversial and complex subject. Readers have professors Tong and Botts to thank for their tireless work on this extremely helpful volume. I highly recommend Feminist Thought if for no other reason than to put the brakes on judgment regarding what “feminist” might mean in today’s highly fragmented and tribalistic culture.

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Edited by Mark Labberton, president of Fuller Theological Seminary, Still Evangelical? contains chapters by ten individuals who consider themselves evangelicals, and their reflections as they wrestle with the meaning of and their association with evangelicalism, especially in light of the 2016 election.

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