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Book Review

Evangelical Feminism

Evangelical Feminism is written to further a cause that has consumed the author's working life: the permanent subordination of women as God's ideal. It judges all fellow evangelicals who disagree on this matter to be "theological liberals," or implicit liberals. The fundamental seismic fault in the author's thinking is that he cannot differentiate between the interpretation of Scripture and Scripture itself. 

Evangelical Identity and Gendered Family Life

Evangelical Identity and Gendered Family Life, by Oregon State University sociology professor Sally K. Gallagher, is a detailed study of evangelical attitudes toward gender and the family. Although many CBE members will be familiar with the basic issues summarized in part I of the book, there remains much to be learned from part II, where Gallagher reviews and interprets results from a major survey of American evangelicals. While her conclusions, presented in part III, are more problematic and must be reviewed cautiously, they still offer provocative and potentially useful ideas

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Evangelicalism: The Coming Generation

Biblical feminists will be interested in a chapter co-authored by Helen V. Stehlin which appears in James Davison Hunter's new book (1987) Evangelicalism: The Coming Generation (University of Chicago Press). The chapter is entitled "Family: Toward Androgyny." Hunter's sociological study of evangelical college and seminary students surveys current attitudes regarding world, morality, self, theology, politics, and the family.

Eve
Eve

Wm. Paul Young, author of The Shack, builds another rich and imaginative space in Eve that questions our conceptions of God, of ourselves, and of the beginning. The novel parallels the rebirth and healing of Lilly from past traumas, with Mother Eve as her guide, and the first birth of creation in Genesis. Through these two stories, Young challenges the reader to let go of preconceived notions, pat answers, and stale imagery of “in the beginning . . . ”

Eve's Revenge

It’s what’s inside that counts.” After years of working to believe this, I’ve found a book that confirms my suspicions—this hollow phrase is only half-true.

Eve’s Revenge by Lilian Calles Barger gives us a thoughtful, grounded perspective on what it means to be human as well as woman. We experience all of life from within a body, but often think that we must choose between a narcissistic culture that would reduce all of life to the body and its desires, and a “spiritual” perspective that seeks to overcome our bodies in the quest for the “true self,” which resides in the

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Everbloom

Everbloom: Stories of Living Deeply Rooted and Transformed Lives is a book meant to be sipped and savored. At first glance it looks like it might be a book of writing prompts, but it is really a collection of forty-two short essays and poems written by women from a large variety of life stages and experiences, and it is also an invitation to reflect on one’s own life experiences.  

Feminist Theology from the Third World

Ursula King’s reader, Feminist Theology from the Third World brings together the diverse perspectives of women engaging in feminist theology, giving recognition and honor to the often absent or underrepresented voices of women of the Third World and women of color in the Unites States. The title highlights the book’s two controversial and misunderstood topics—the Third World and feminist theology. 

As a whole, Feminist Thought is a thoroughly-researched and concise treatment of a notoriously controversial and complex subject. Readers have professors Tong and Botts to thank for their tireless work on this extremely helpful volume. I highly recommend Feminist Thought if for no other reason than to put the brakes on judgment regarding what “feminist” might mean in today’s highly fragmented and tribalistic culture.

Finally Feminist

Finally Feminist is designed to speak to both sides of the gender debate within the evangelical church. Stackhouse attempts to affirm both sides with "a single, coherent paradigm that amounts finally to a Christian feminism" (10). The book grew out of a series of lectures given while the author was a visiting scholar at Taylor University (Indiana) and Acadia Divinity College in Nova Scotia. Only 144 pages, the book's discussion of gender is limited to the status and roles of women and men in church and family.

Find Your Brave

Find Your Brave is not an explicitly egalitarian book. It does not address issues such as women in church leadership or the relations between the sexes. Instead, Holly Wagner exhorts her readers to remain strong during times of adversity by drawing upon the strength of God. Her message is applicable, therefore, to every Christian, no matter what doctrinal position they hold concerning the role of women in the church.

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