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Book Review

Mirror Mirror

Written by Kara Powell and Kendall Payne, Mirror Mirror provides a balanced, even-handed approach to looking at a broad range of issues facing young women, including body image, dating, makeup, leadership, giftedness, health and friendship. Focusing on teaching girls to be content in their relationships with God rather than searching elsewhere for security and love, Payne and Powell do not label issues and topics such as dating or makeup as inherently evil. Instead, through their stories, articles and thought-provoking questions, they address the often destructive and harmful

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Naked

Naked is a marriage book thoroughly steeped in egalitarian theology and completely free from gender stereotypes and tired “male headship” language. Tim and Anne Evans bring decades of counseling and ministry experience to their work, and the result is an extremely helpful and approachable guide for married couples. 

Neither Complementarian nor Egalitarian

Increasingly, one of the latest reactions to the evangelical gender debate among some younger Christian women is “I am neither complementarian nor egalitarian,” inviting the reply: So, then, what are you? And, why do you respond in this way?Michelle Lee-Barnewall, associate professor of biblical and theological studies at Talbot School of Theology at Biola University, gives voice to this relatively recent group.

No Little Women

No Little Women: Equipping All Women in the Household of God, by Aimee Byrd, provides many practical challenges to female disciples and their leaders. It challenges women to become better equipped for ministry, learn and exercise discernment in their educational tools, and prompts them to take responsibility for becoming “good theologians with informed convictions” (178). However, because of the complementarian theology pushed in this book, it will prove to be a frustrating read for many egalitarians.

No Place for Abuse

“When abuse strikes, there is no home.”

So say Catherine Clark Kroeger and Nancy Nason-Clark in their book, No Place for Abuse. This quote struck me, as I grew up in a fundamentalist church where mentioning some personal abuse brought blame to me and sympathy to my father. This book is refreshing in its directness as it addresses the ticklish issue of how churches have traditionally dealt with abuse.

No Stones

Marnie Ferree presents a deeply moving and sometimes disturbing investigation of sexual abuse from the perspective of the injured, as one who was deeply wounded through sexual victimization, and the healer, as an actively working counselor and minister to those who have experienced similar abuse. And, as if such revelatory investigations from the first-person perspective were not difficult enough, Ferree takes the discussion to an entirely new depth of difficulty: she presents herself as the perpetrator as well.

No Will of My Own

This small book (75 pages) elucidates a great present-day adversary to biblical justice and equality: patriarchy. The book is written for the Body of Christ. It is the wish of the author to bring consciousness of the subject to church membership and leadership alike. The view here presented is that patriarchy is not merely uncomfortable for some women, but toxic and dangerous to all men and women in the faith.

Non-Prophet Murders

There's an old story I've heard passed among fiction writers about an author sitting hopefully at a book signing waiting for someone to notice and purchase her book. A customer picks up the novel with finger and thumb with the relish that one would a diaper some toddler had lost on the floor and asks accusingly, "Is this book true?" The hapless author, stung at the question, shoots back, "No, sir, it is not. It is truth!" My recommendation is this: When repression gets you down, I prescribe two chapters of Non-Prophet Murders and a cup of tea. 

Not Alone

This book is about widows, but some of the widows chosen are better known as mothers or because of their remarriages. It is written for widows, and for women in crisis. It quietly and simply speaks words of comfort, encouragement, and practical advice.

This book is useful for more than widows. Many of the issues focused on such as generosity, prayer, and faith are issues that have been important to me as a life-long single woman.

Not Marked

Not Marked is recommended without reservation to Christian men and women who want to discover that help and healing are available to those who feel forever stained by the shame of sexual abuse and assault. 

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