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Book Review

No Will of My Own

This small book (75 pages) elucidates a great present-day adversary to biblical justice and equality: patriarchy. The book is written for the Body of Christ. It is the wish of the author to bring consciousness of the subject to church membership and leadership alike. The view here presented is that patriarchy is not merely uncomfortable for some women, but toxic and dangerous to all men and women in the faith.

Non-Prophet Murders

There's an old story I've heard passed among fiction writers about an author sitting hopefully at a book signing waiting for someone to notice and purchase her book. A customer picks up the novel with finger and thumb with the relish that one would a diaper some toddler had lost on the floor and asks accusingly, "Is this book true?" The hapless author, stung at the question, shoots back, "No, sir, it is not. It is truth!" My recommendation is this: When repression gets you down, I prescribe two chapters of Non-Prophet Murders and a cup of tea. 

Not Alone

This book is about widows, but some of the widows chosen are better known as mothers or because of their remarriages. It is written for widows, and for women in crisis. It quietly and simply speaks words of comfort, encouragement, and practical advice.

This book is useful for more than widows. Many of the issues focused on such as generosity, prayer, and faith are issues that have been important to me as a life-long single woman.

Not Marked

Not Marked is recommended without reservation to Christian men and women who want to discover that help and healing are available to those who feel forever stained by the shame of sexual abuse and assault. 

One God in Three Persons

Wayne Grudem says that for twenty-five years he has believed that how the Trinity is understood “may well turn out to be the most decisive factor in finally deciding” the bitter debate between evangelicals about the status and ministry of women. This is encouraging to hear, because Grudem and many of his fellow complementarians have got the doctrine of the Trinity completely wrong . . . The creeds, the confessions, and virtually all the great theologians of the past and present reject completely any hierarchical ordering in divine life.

Partners in Christ

John Stackhouse should be a natural ally of Christians for Biblical Equality. He is a committed follower of Jesus, a careful thinker, and an unabashed egalitarian, gladly identifying himself as a Christian feminist who “champions the dignity, rights, responsibilities, and glories of women as equal in importance to those of men” (p. 14). In his book Partners in Christ: A Conservative Case for Egalitarianism, he makes a nuanced case for the full equality of women. However, Stackhouse’s approach will make some egalitarians uneasy, and his strong emphasis on accommodating to the

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Partners in Christ

The book is thought-provoking. I would not consider it a foundational book on the topic. It could be used well with a skeptic with whom one has a close relationship and can interact with on the chapters. Simply handing the book to a complementarian and recommending they read it would probably not be effective. One needs to be on the journey toward egalitarianism to appreciate this book most.

"In this book, Giles offers a thorough and practical analysis of early church leadership, especially regarding women’s participation. While readers may notice a number of typographical errors, these mistakes do not diminish the substance of this helpful work. Giles provides an accessible and easily understandable study of this important topic from an egalitarian perspective."

Paul and Gender

In summation, Westfall’s book does not offer the church merely an egalitarian reading of a few isolated texts. Instead, she paints a broad and coherent mosaic that will force complementarians to grapple not only with her judicious exegesis of the relevant texts, but also with the reality that the totality of Paul’s theology supports women in ministry. Paul, as Westfall has amply established, is more than the sum of a few verses; indeed, Paul is the apostle not just to men, but also to women.

Phoebe: A Story

In this work of historical fiction, Paula Gooder presents an imaginative telling of the life and ministry of Phoebe. While Gooder does not offer an introduction to the book, she does provide helpful comments in the endnotes. She states that her purpose in writing this story is not simply to provide an entertaining novel, but also to inform readers of the reality behind the NT text (225).

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