Book Review | CBE International

You are here

Book Review

Feminist Theology from the Third World

Ursula King’s reader, Feminist Theology from the Third World brings together the diverse perspectives of women engaging in feminist theology, giving recognition and honor to the often absent or underrepresented voices of women of the Third World and women of color in the Unites States. The title highlights the book’s two controversial and misunderstood topics—the Third World and feminist theology. 

Forgotten Girls

A follow-up to the 2003 book, Daughters of Hope, which describes the persecution of women worldwide, Forgotten Girls focuses on the need to stop the generational cycles of abuse and oppression where they begin—with little girls. Strom and Rickett use their extensive experience to help launch believers on the road to action with reliable information, achievable goals, and the passion to make a difference in the lives of forgotten girls. Forgotten Girls is a moving, encouraging, and practical resource for Christians concerned with advancing biblical equality and

Read More
Hearts of Fire

I highly recommend this book to those that are entering the missionary field, men and women alike. It is also a perfect source of inspiration and encouragement for those weighed down by the challenges life brings. Hearts of Fire will lead the reader into a space of gratitude that will cause a shift in the core of their humanity. These stories will renew in readers a reverent love for Christ and truly set their hearts on fire.

Hidden History of Women's Ordination

Dr. Macy’s book is a scholarly one that will appeal to academics and theologians. He includes two appendices with copies, in Latin, of the prayers and ordination rites for deaconesses and abbesses. In his conclusion he expresses his hope that the evidence for the ordination of women in the early Middle Ages will provoke discussion about the definition of ordination in our era.

Is It My Fault

There are many excellent books on the topic of domestic abuse, but this is one of the more practical ones that I have read. Included in its helpful resources is a detailed plan or “exit strategy” for the abuse “victim” who has decided she must leave the situation for the well-being of herself and any children involved. It also offers a section explaining how abuse in the home affects children, providing another point of reasoning as to why the best option might be to plan to leave. Throughout the book, the authors emphasize that abusive situations are not magically resolved, but offer

Read More
Junia

Junia, A Woman, An Apostle by David Williams is a thorough examination of Romans 16:7. The book is intended to introduce general readership to the technical arguments for the conclusion that the person spoken of in this verse was a woman apostle.

Not Marked

Not Marked is recommended without reservation to Christian men and women who want to discover that help and healing are available to those who feel forever stained by the shame of sexual abuse and assault. 

The Tie That Binds

In The Tie That Binds, the author, Debra White Smith, provides some excellent advice, like respecting each partner’s unique gifts, and focusing on scripture rather than the gender stereotypes of our culture. But she also emphasizes that working for equality is a fallacy, stating instead that our goal should be to serve our spouses (and, of course, Christ).

Too Heavy a Yoke

Too Heavy A Yoke is an important and accessible resource for understanding the ways in which racism and sexism—both historical and contemporary—impacts the lives of black women. I finished the book with a much better understanding of the historical and contemporary social pressures on constructions of black womanhood. While the book is accessible to a variety of audiences, the meticulous footnotes offer interested readers a variety of further reading on all of the topics Walker-Barnes explores. In addition, Walker-Barnes’ suggestions for healing are both important and useful; this

Read More
Western Daughters in Eastern Lands

Seton has written an excellent textbook that contributes substantial knowledge regarding women’s contributions to world missions in the past two centuries. Historically, women have comprised more than two-thirds of the missionary work force for well over a century now, yet their contributions remain almost completely unknown. In a world where their contributions have been minimized and often forgotten, Seton offers a refreshing and much-needed account of women’s centrality in fulfilling the Great Commission.

Pages